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PhotoCloth - Photos in a Realistic 3D Interactive Cloth Simulation

$0.99
iPhone / iPad
Genres:
  • Photo & Video
  • Entertainment
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Download from AppStore

Turn any photo into a realistic 3D interactive cloth simulation!

PhotoCloth turns your photos into an interactive toy and can record mesmerizing videos! It's addictive! Static screenshots do not do it justice, click the PhotoCloth Support button below to see videos of PhotoCloth in action.

- Toss a photo into the air and see it float.
- Catch the photo with your finger and twirl it.
- Tilt the iPhone and watch the photo react to gravity.
- Pin two corners and the photo will wave like a flag.
- Put it into "free fall" mode and try to catch it.
- Twirl the photo into a rotating frenzy.
- Hit the red record button and record your interactions as a video - then post it to Facebook, Twitter, YouTube etc. to share with the world.

PhotoCloth reflects YOU and YOUR interests! Use any of your own photos.

- Poke the baby's belly
- Throw your boss into the air
- Catch a friend
- Prank strangers
- Have fun with your own pet photos

PhotoCloth is a 3D interactive dynamic cloth simulation that reacts to gravity. Tilting the iPhone causes the PhotoCloth to hang in that direction. Two corners of the PhotoCloth can be "pinned" to any side of the iPhone. The PhotoCloth can be put into "free fall" mode where it is not anchored at all. The photo image can be rotated on the cloth to match the orientation of the iPhone. The PhotoCloth reacts to touch, you can touch and slide with your finger to drag, stretch and flip the cloth.

The cloth is very fluid and realistic. It's entertaining to play with, you'll soon be addicted to it. Best of all, you can use any of your own favorite images. It never gets old, because you can change the photo as easily as taking a picture on your iPhone, or choose a photo from your photo library.

Photos can be imported from the image library, camera roll or directly from the camera. The selected photo is then mapped onto a fluid 3D simulation of a piece of cloth fabric.